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The OSHA standard for Lockout/Tagout addresses the practices and procedures necessary to disable machinery or equipment, thereby preventing the release of hazardous energy while employees perform servicing and maintenance activities.

The OSHA standard for The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout), Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910.147, addresses the practices and procedures necessary to disable machinery or equipment, thereby preventing the release of hazardous energy while employees perform servicing and maintenance activities. The standard outlines measures for controlling hazardous energies – electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, and other energy sources.

Use this checklist to ensure compliance with Lockout/Tagout standard (CFR) 1910.147; any unchecked activities indicate a gap in compliance, and can result in serious fines or injury to your workers.

Download a printable copy of the Audit Checklist for Control of Hazardous Energy document here.

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Previously featured on National Marker Company.

For Lockout Tagout equipment provided by National Marker, please visit MSCDirect.com.

 

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